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Bianco NA, Franks PW, Hicks JL, Delp SL. 2021. Coupled exoskeleton assistance simplifies control and maintains metabolic benefits: a simulation study. PLOS One, in review. (2021)
Abstract

Assistive exoskeletons can reduce the metabolic cost of walking, and recent advances in exoskeleton device design and control have resulted in large metabolic savings. Most exoskeleton devices provide assistance at either the ankle or hip. Exoskeletons that assist multiple joints have the potential to provide greater metabolic savings, but can require many actuators and complicated controllers, making it difficult to design effective assistance. Coupled assistance, when two or more joints are assisted using one actuator or control signal, could reduce control dimensionality while retaining metabolic benefits. However, it is unknown which combinations of assisted joints are most promising and if there are negative consequences associated with coupled assistance. Since designing assistance with human experiments is expensive and time-consuming, we used musculoskeletal simulation to evaluate metabolic savings from multi-joint assistance and identify promising joint combinations. We generated 2D muscle-driven simulations of walking while simultaneously optimizing control strategies for simulated lower-limb exoskeleton assistive devices to minimize metabolic cost. Each device provided assistance either at a single joint or at multiple joints using massless, ideal actuators. To assess if control could be simplified for multi-joint exoskeletons, we simulated different control strategies in which the torque provided at each joint was either controlled independently or coupled between joints. We compared the predicted optimal torque profiles and changes in muscle and whole-body metabolic power consumption across the single joint and multi-joint assistance strategies. We found multi-joint devices--whether independent or coupled--provided 50% greater metabolic savings than single joint devices. The coupled multi-joint devices were able to achieve most of the metabolic savings produced by independently-controlled multi-joint devices. Our results indicate that device designers could simplify multi-joint exoskeleton designs by reducing the number of torque control parameters through coupling, while still maintaining large reductions in metabolic cost.


Simulations of exoskeleton devices, where torque controls have the same timing between joints, or "coupled" control.

License: Additional manuscript files, Experimental data, simulations, Raw data

In this study, we simulated exoskeleton devices that used one optimized control signal to provide torque assistance at multiple lower-limb joints, or “coupled” assistance. We found that coupled multi-joint devices could provide 50% greater metabolic savings than single joint devices. Further, coupled multi-joint devices were able to achieve similar metabolic savings to more complex multi-joint devices that controlled torques at each joint independently. Our results indicate that device designers could simplify multi-joint exoskeleton designs by reducing the number of torque control parameters through coupling, while still maintaining large reductions in metabolic cost.

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